Books I Read in 2012

As the reviews editor for Extrapolation, I read more nonfiction than fiction these days, mostly science fiction criticism, but I got through a hundred novels in 2012, give or take, and I thought I'd jump on the I-am-an-author-and-these-are-the-books-I-read-this-year-because-I-am-an-author train, if only to maintain appearances. Here they are in no particular order:

Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Fill the Grand Canyon and Live Forever
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick

Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance

Raw Dog Screaming Press has purchased the rights to my short novel Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance and will be reprinting it in 2013. The reprint will include an introduction by Ian Cooper, author of a terrific cultography on Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, and cover art by Matthew Revert. It will be available as both a paperback and ebook.

In the meantime, pick up a copy of the original edition for as little as $132.74 and as much as $374.96! Yeesh.

The D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize

Guidelines for the 2013 D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize have been finalized. Here they are:

Overview

The D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize is presented annually by Raw Dog Screaming Press to a collection of short fiction or a novel. Sponsored by Wright State University-Lake Campus, the award takes its name from author, editor, critic and English professor D. Harlan Wilson, whose body of fiction and nonfiction engages multiple genres and styles. Submitted works should demonstrate an aesthetic of genuine innovation and originality that stands comfortably alongside RDSP’s library of titles. The award entails a cash prize of $1000 plus publication by RDSP.

Deadlines

Submissions for the first annual D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize will be accepted between February 1 and June 30, 2013. The winner will be announced by October 2013.

Judges

Submissions will be blind-judged by a committee of RDSP authors and editors. D. Harlan Wilson will select the winner from a small pool of finalists.

Submissions Guidelines

Please account for the following criteria:
  • Submissions should be anonymous. The author’s name must not appear anywhere on the manuscript and the title page should only contain the title. Submit manuscripts as .doc or .pdf files via this submission manager. Format according to industry-standard manuscript guidelines.
  • A formal cover letter with a biography and contact information should be attached separately.
  • Submissions should not exceed 80,000 words.
  • There is a $25 submission fee. You may submit more than one manuscript on the condition that each submission is accompanied by a $25 fee.
  • Simultaneous submissions to other publishers are permitted as long as authors promptly inform RDSP if their work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submissions are open to authors living in the US.
  • Authors previously published by RDSP are not eligible.
  • Translations and works previously published by a professional press are not eligible.
  • Previously self-published works will be considered on the condition that they can be put out of print for at least six months before publication.
In the event that a winning manuscript does not present itself among the entries, RDSP reserves the right not to award the D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize.

Transformers Essay

My critical essay "Technomasculine Bodies & Vehicles of Desire: The Erotic Delirium of Michael Bay's Transformers" appears in the latest issue of Extrapolation. I let fly with the techno-jargon in this one, but all in good fun. Here's the abstract:

Michael Bay’s Transformers (2007) fetishizes technology and represents automobiles as “vehicles” of sexuality. Despite being aliens/others, transformers collectively function as a channel for technomasculine desire and American sociocultural production. The film belies its popcorn veneer in spite of authorial and directorial intent, depicting an “autogeddon” reminiscent of J. G. Ballard’s Crash (1973), which eroticizes the violent process of “automutilation.” Transformers do likewise as they repeatedly clash with (i.e., crash into) one another in an agential effort to reify male power and identity.

Also included in this issue is my review of the Norton Critical Edition of Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange. If you're interested in science fiction criticism, consider subscribing to Extrapolation and joining the Science Fiction Research Association.

RDSP Gift Guide

Please have a look at Raw Dog Screaming Press's Holiday Gift Guide over at InveterateMediaJunkies.com. Among many fine selections is my upcoming novel The Kyoto Man, currently available for preorder in three different formats, and best read, it appears, with a glass of Macallan 1949 Single Malt in the presence of John Goodman.

RDSP to Publish Director S. Craig Zahler

My publisher, Raw Dog Screaming Press, sealed the deal today to publish director S. Craig Zahler's second novel in 2013. Zahler is currently directing Bone Tomahawk, an ultraviolent wild west flic about four men who set out to rescue a group of captives from cannibalistic cave dwellers staring Jennifer Carpenter, Timothy Olyphant, Kurt Russell, Richard Jenkins and Peter Sarsgaard. Doesn't get much better than that! Find out more about the movie at Deadline.

Review of OSAMA in LARB

My review of Lavie Tidhar's alternate-history novel Osama went live today in Los Angeles Review of Books. Great book — great author. Here's my thesis paragraph:

"I want to make the bold suggestion that OSAMA is the narrative symphony Philip K. Dick wished he could have composed. Not only is it beautifully written, it is expertly crafted and, for me, functions as a commentary on Dick’s inimitable narrative of failure as well as a broader ontology of failure that recurrently plagues the human experience. Osama falls into the arena of SF and fantasy. But the genre elements are soft. The novel might just as easily be the mainstream effort of a 'serious literary writer' — what Dick yearned for, and what Tidhar is. Whether he wanted to or not, Tidhar has effectively out-PKDed PKD."

LINT: THE MOVIE

Here's part 1 of the Jeff Lint biopic based on the book, LINT, by Steve Aylett. There are a few excerpts from my interview in it.