Books I Read in 2012

As the reviews editor for Extrapolation, I read more nonfiction than fiction these days, mostly science fiction criticism, but I got through a hundred novels in 2012, give or take, and I thought I'd jump on the I-am-an-author-and-these-are-the-books-I-read-this-year-because-I-am-an-author train, if only to maintain appearances. Here they are in no particular order:

Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Fill the Grand Canyon and Live Forever
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick

Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance

Raw Dog Screaming Press has purchased the rights to my short novel Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance and will be reprinting it in 2013. The reprint will include an introduction by Ian Cooper, author of a terrific cultography on Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, and cover art by Matthew Revert. It will be available as both a paperback and ebook.

In the meantime, pick up a copy of the original edition for as little as $132.74 and as much as $374.96! Yeesh.

The D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize

Guidelines for the 2013 D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize have been finalized. Here they are:

Overview

The D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize is presented annually by Raw Dog Screaming Press to a collection of short fiction or a novel. Sponsored by Wright State University-Lake Campus, the award takes its name from author, editor, critic and English professor D. Harlan Wilson, whose body of fiction and nonfiction engages multiple genres and styles. Submitted works should demonstrate an aesthetic of genuine innovation and originality that stands comfortably alongside RDSP’s library of titles. The award entails a cash prize of $1000 plus publication by RDSP.

Deadlines

Submissions for the first annual D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize will be accepted between February 1 and June 30, 2013. The winner will be announced by October 2013.

Judges

Submissions will be blind-judged by a committee of RDSP authors and editors. D. Harlan Wilson will select the winner from a small pool of finalists.

Submissions Guidelines

Please account for the following criteria:
  • Submissions should be anonymous. The author’s name must not appear anywhere on the manuscript and the title page should only contain the title. Submit manuscripts as .doc or .pdf files via this submission manager. Format according to industry-standard manuscript guidelines.
  • A formal cover letter with a biography and contact information should be attached separately.
  • Submissions should not exceed 80,000 words.
  • There is a $25 submission fee. You may submit more than one manuscript on the condition that each submission is accompanied by a $25 fee.
  • Simultaneous submissions to other publishers are permitted as long as authors promptly inform RDSP if their work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submissions are open to authors living in the US.
  • Authors previously published by RDSP are not eligible.
  • Translations and works previously published by a professional press are not eligible.
  • Previously self-published works will be considered on the condition that they can be put out of print for at least six months before publication.
In the event that a winning manuscript does not present itself among the entries, RDSP reserves the right not to award the D. Harlan Wilson Book Prize.

Transformers Essay

My critical essay "Technomasculine Bodies & Vehicles of Desire: The Erotic Delirium of Michael Bay's Transformers" appears in the latest issue of Extrapolation. I let fly with the techno-jargon in this one, but all in good fun. Here's the abstract:

Michael Bay’s Transformers (2007) fetishizes technology and represents automobiles as “vehicles” of sexuality. Despite being aliens/others, transformers collectively function as a channel for technomasculine desire and American sociocultural production. The film belies its popcorn veneer in spite of authorial and directorial intent, depicting an “autogeddon” reminiscent of J. G. Ballard’s Crash (1973), which eroticizes the violent process of “automutilation.” Transformers do likewise as they repeatedly clash with (i.e., crash into) one another in an agential effort to reify male power and identity.

Also included in this issue is my review of the Norton Critical Edition of Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange. If you're interested in science fiction criticism, consider subscribing to Extrapolation and joining the Science Fiction Research Association.

RDSP Gift Guide

Please have a look at Raw Dog Screaming Press's Holiday Gift Guide over at InveterateMediaJunkies.com. Among many fine selections is my upcoming novel The Kyoto Man, currently available for preorder in three different formats, and best read, it appears, with a glass of Macallan 1949 Single Malt in the presence of John Goodman.

RDSP to Publish Director S. Craig Zahler

My publisher, Raw Dog Screaming Press, sealed the deal today to publish director S. Craig Zahler's second novel in 2013. Zahler is currently directing Bone Tomahawk, an ultraviolent wild west flic about four men who set out to rescue a group of captives from cannibalistic cave dwellers staring Jennifer Carpenter, Timothy Olyphant, Kurt Russell, Richard Jenkins and Peter Sarsgaard. Doesn't get much better than that! Find out more about the movie at Deadline.

Review of OSAMA in LARB

My review of Lavie Tidhar's alternate-history novel Osama went live today in Los Angeles Review of Books. Great book — great author. Here's my thesis paragraph:

"I want to make the bold suggestion that OSAMA is the narrative symphony Philip K. Dick wished he could have composed. Not only is it beautifully written, it is expertly crafted and, for me, functions as a commentary on Dick’s inimitable narrative of failure as well as a broader ontology of failure that recurrently plagues the human experience. Osama falls into the arena of SF and fantasy. But the genre elements are soft. The novel might just as easily be the mainstream effort of a 'serious literary writer' — what Dick yearned for, and what Tidhar is. Whether he wanted to or not, Tidhar has effectively out-PKDed PKD."

LINT: THE MOVIE

Here's part 1 of the Jeff Lint biopic based on the book, LINT, by Steve Aylett. There are a few excerpts from my interview in it.

Press Kit for The Kyoto Man

The press kit for The Kyoto Man, the third and final installment in my Scikungfi trilogy, is now complete. Included is a press release, an excerpt, advance praise, contact information, and other usual suspects. The book is available for preorder in three different formats. Find out more at www.thekyotoman.com. Adieu.

Emanations: Second Sight

My story "Entelechy" appears in a new anthology, Emanations: Second Sight, the followup to Emanations. Both are edited by Carter Kaplan and feature fiction and nonfiction from across the world. Here's the cover description:

The attempt itself reveals both the machinery and the resolve. Rising against the gravitational seductions of former disbelief, the unclosing eye is disabused of shadowy fear and caging illusion. In these pages of poetry, fiction, essays and art, spheres of an original geometry draw together and at long last illuminate that elusively crystalizing plane of second sight, angelic knowledge, and bright eternity. Here, should fortune favor our bold attempt, we might grasp the fires of joy, forge them into thunderbolts, and launch them high to ignite the stars of our most exalted and passionate emanations.

Stories by Maddie

My 5-year-old daughter Maddie's literary output continues to dwarf my own. Here are some of her latest pieces:

Happiness

The zebra was happy, because I watched him. THE END.

Waterdancing

A little boy is at the beach, and it was raining. He went there to dance in the water. THE END.

A Young Monster

Once upon a time there was a dog in a house. Her name was Marla. Outside, a pink square had attached itself to the snowman, not far from a monster with a black head. The monster was eight years old. THE END.

Black Friday Book Deals

If, like me, you prefer to do your Black Friday shopping online, here are some cheap ebooks of mine:

They Had Goat Heads
Kindle
Nook

Dr. Identity, or, Farewell to Plaquedemia
Book I of the Scikungfi Trilogy
Kindle
Nook

Codename Prague
Book II of the Scikungfi Trilogy
Kindle
Nook

And if you'd like to spend a little more money, you can preorder Book III of the Scikungfi Trilogy, The Kyoto Man, directly from Raw Dog Screaming Press.

Preorders Available for The Kyoto Man

The Kyoto Man may now be preordered directly from the publisher as a signed limited edition hardcover, a standard hardcover, and a paperback at Raw Dog Scream Press. Here's the cover description:

In the wake of the Stick Figure War, civilization lapsed into obscurity. Fallout ravaged the fabric of space and time. History digested reality and reality exhumed the future as survivors tried and failed to create a new beginning ... Amid the chaos, one man experiences a terminal affliction, a revolution of the self: the chronic transformation into the city of Kyoto, Japan. Each transformation further plunges the world into darkness, but he’s helpless against the lethal clockwork of his body, his psyche, his mindscreens—and nothing, not even Fate itself, can stop him from becoming God ... In the third and final installment of the Scikungfi trilogy after Dr. Identity and Codename Prague, acclaimed author D. Harlan Wilson composes a narrative grindhouse that combines elements of science fiction and horror with pop culture and literary theory. Erudite, ultraviolent, and riotously satirical, The Kyoto Man reminds us how, at every turn, reality is shaped by the forces that destroy it.

Outre

Here's a rough stillshot of my novel-in-progress, Outre.

CHAPTER ?
NATTY BUMPPO

Nathaniel hated it when Herman called him “Natty.”

Which is why he called him Natty.

Herman was known to employ “Natty” as a rhetorical device during heated conversations. For example:

“Tell me, Natty, what is it that Pearl really symbolizes for you? I mean, really. I assume it’s not idle demonism, Natty, or a reminder of Hester’s misbegotten desire, or a mark—a scar, mind you—of unfettered artistry and imagination. I mean, what’s a girl to do when a man like Dimmesdale takes his trousers off? Ha. Ha ha ha ha ha. Anyway it’s the goddamned Reverend’s fault, is the thing, and Pearl belongs to him, so to speak. Natty? Hey Natty. Natty. Are you listening to me?”

Nathaniel tried to ignore him, but sometimes it was unbearable, especially when Herman drank too much, which prompted Nathaniel to drink too much, and then, of course, there was a fight, and eventually Herman ended up somewhere in the woods with his clothes off, and on occasion, he streaked through town until the police picked him up.

Natty. As in Natty Bumppo.

Both authors hated Jim Cooper, a relentless popinjay who could barely string a sentence together, in their eyes, but ultimately they couldn’t stand that Cooper had obtained pulp stardom, publishing bestseller after bestseller in multiple speculative genres while writing with the finesse, lyricism and dimensionality of plantlife. They couldn’t deny the prowess of some of Cooper’s descriptive passages, namely his “landscape paintings” of other planets. But generally they panned and disparaged and vilified his decidedly slackjaw prose as well as his dumb protagonists, above all the inveterate Natty Bumppo, antihero of the Firestocking Tales, a sort of Buck Rogers meets Moravagine character obviously patterned after Cooper himself, or at least after how Coooper perceived himself, since in reality, as Herman and Nathaniel saw it, he was a far cry from the smooth-talking, girl-getting, pec-flexing, essentially Burroughsian Bumppo. Hence Herman’s small victory vis-à-vis Nathaniel whenever he uttered the character’s forename.

Occasionally Nathaniel attempted to retaliate against Herman’s aggression by calling him Hermes, or Huckleberry, or Huey, or HAL 9000, but it always fell flat. As a friendly insult, Natty fit with Nathaniel better than anything else he could come up with. Also, whenever Nathaniel called him something, Herman just stared at him, unwilling to submit to such “puerile modalities,” as he referred to them. A fly could get a rise out of Nathaniel. But an earthquake couldn’t budge Herman. Sometimes.

The Kyoto Man Release Dates

In December 2012, 100 signed limited hardcover editions of The Kyoto Man will be available for purchase directly from Raw Dog Screaming Press. The edition includes "Additional Supplements & Amino Acids," among them various outtakes, reboots, meta-sublimations, and the controversial Bushido chapter. Then, in March 2013, the paperback, Kindle and Nook versions of the novel will come out. You can read the first chapter at The Kyoto Man's flashsite, which was built by Merge-Design. A press kit will be available soon at my official website.

The Kyoto Man is the third and final installment in my Scikungfi Trilogy. If you'd like to check out the first two installments, they are:

Dr. Identity, or, Farewell to Plaquedemia
Book I of the Scikungfi Trilogy
Raw Dog Screaming Press (2007)
Hardcover
Paperback
Kindle
Nook

Codename Prague
Book II of the Scikungfi Trilogy
Raw Dog Screaming Press (2011)
Hardcover
Paperback
Kindle
Nook


The Dream People #38

The latest issue of The Dream People is now available featuring fiction by Grimley Bogue, Steve Rasnic Tem, KJ Hannah Greenberg, Lucy Mihajlich, Sayuri Yamada and AE Reiff. There are also book excerpts from Jason Jack Miller, Leland Pitts-Gonzalez, Tom Bradley and Matthew Revert. Please drop by and have a look.

DogCon 2012 FaceTime Reading

Here is the reading I did via FaceTime for DogCon 2012. It's in two parts. I read a short story, "Presidency," which will appear in the first volume of my upcoming fiction collection Battle without Honor or Humanity. I had never used FaceTime before. I hit a few bumps, but eventually I got used to it.



COG by K. Ceres Wright

Next year, Dog Star Books, the new science fiction imprint of my publisher Raw Dog Screaming Press, will release its debut novel. Here's the lowdown:

Author:  K. Ceres Wright

Cover Artist: Bradley Sharp

Publisher: Dog Star Books

Genre: Cyberpunk Science Fiction

Tagline: In a futuristic world where personalities can be downloaded at will, who's a girl to trust? 

Release Date: Summer 2013

Call for Reviewers

Following is a list of titles that are currently available for review in Extrapolation. As always, if you are interested, email me and let me know. If we haven't worked together before, please tell me a little about yourself and your area(s) of study. I will try my best to accommodate everybody as judiciously as I can. (NOTE: The first two books have been in my possession for awhile. I would appreciate anybody with the expertise to take them on.)

B. Costello & Q. Whitted, eds. Comics & the U.S. South.
T. Leaver. Artifical Culture.
J.A. Kerswell. The Slasher Movie Book.
E. Gaspar (trans. A. Bell et al). The Time Ship.
S. Delany. Starboard Wine.
M. Pharr & L. Clark, eds. Of Bread, Blood and The Hunger Games.
J. Cogburn & M. Silcox, eds. Dungeons & Dragons & Philosophy.
D. Newell and V. Lamont. Judith Merril: A Critical Study.
C. Miller & A. Van Riper, eds.1950s "Rocketman" TV Series &Their Fans.
J. McGrath, ed. Religion & Science Fiction.