Fantastique Unfettered #4

The fourth issue of Fantastique Unfettered is now available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. I mentioned its availability in an earlier post prematurely; the official release was December 26. The issue includes "Verite," a story of mine that will appear down the road in Battle without Honor or Humanity Vol. 2. Here's a press kit.

Upcoming Reviews

Here's my current queue of books for review in early 2012:

Robert Crossley. Imagining Mars: A Literary History. Wesleyan UP, 2011.
Mark Rawlinson, ed. A Clockwork Orange: A Norton Critical Edition. W.W. Norton & Co., 2011.
Daniel H. Wilson. Robopocalypse. Simon & Shuster, 2011.
Jonathan Lethem & Pamela Jackson, eds. The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick. Houghton Mifflin, 2011.

I'm really excited about all of these titles. I've finished reading Imagining Mars and it's excellent. All reviews will appear in Extrapolation, except for the review of my doppelganger's novel, which will appear in Foundation.

Notes on Aylett

If you know me, you know I can't stand reading other authors, except for Herman Melville, and a few other, mostly dead, assholes. Plus Steve Aylett.

A few items of note:

[1] Here is a recent radio interview Aylett did on NTS Live.

[2] Slaughtermatic is now available on Kindle. This is the book that got me interested in Aylett's work when it came out in the late 1990s. It was a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Award.

[3] My review of Aylett's latest and last Beerlight novel, Novahead, will appear soon in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction. I will present an extended version of this review at the 2012 annual convention of the Science Fiction Research Association.

[4] If you haven't seen it yet, you probably won't. Nonetheless LINT: THE MOVIE exists.

Personality Rehab

Last night I dreamt that I needed personality rehabilitation. A group of elderly women sentenced me. My wife, mother, and the women in my extended family endorsed the sentence. None of the men in the dream cared one way or the other. The rehab facility was located in Flint, Michigan. At first I agreed to go, but then I got mad and yelled at everybody. The feeling of refreshment I experienced upon waking was laced with idle dread.

Lofton Gitt Reviews The Kyoto Man

In addition to writing a preliminary blurb for The Kyoto Man, Lofton Gitt has written a full review that will be published in the NYT Book Review. Here’s one passage I really liked:

"According to Herman Melville’s foremost biographer, Newton Arvin, the 'aborted author' lived on a diet of 'nostalgia for the venerable and the moribund, and mingled with this was some still more special longing for the Biblical, the Hebraic, the Judaean pastthe past of the patriarchs and the judges, the prophets and the kings. Few men’s minds have been more richly stored than Melville’s with the imagery of Biblical story, of the Old Testament record especially; it had been woven into the fabric of his imagination from earliest childhood, and he had constantly recurred to it; it was a permanent point of reference for his spirit.' Without question, the scikungfi trilogy constitutes Wilson’s Moby Dick—allusions to everything from the White Whale to the plight of the bearded artist are as rampant as they are dubious and ultimately moot—only instead of the Bible, the traumatic kernel that clearly energizes Wilson and determines the flows of his desires is the science fiction genre, the machinery of which materializes in the trilogy, again and again, through the techno-idiotic sieve of pop culture. Of course, it will be some time before readers are ready to attend to the dynamics of science fiction with the same enthusiasm and interest as the Bible, despite the ongoing science fictionalization of reality, and Wilson expects far too much from readers, who grow increasingly more handicapped, disabled and zombified every day. Melville’s readers were neither prepared for nor willing to engage with his texts at the level of acuity he requiredas Arvin writes, his audience failed to 'follow him into the intellectual and imaginative regions that were his true territory.' Certainly Wilson can expect nothing more than this. At best, he might hope to be altogether ignored, forgotten before he is even remembered, and as I understand it, he is doing a good job in this capacity."

Reviewers for Lance Olsen's Architectures of Possibility

As an associate editor of Guide Dog Books, the nonfiction syndicate of Raw Dog Screaming Press, I'd like to call attention to the publisher's latest venture, Lance Olsen's Architectures of Possibility: After Innovative Writing.

If you are interested in reviewing the book, please email me or the publisher for advanced reader copies.

Here's a description:

Ideal for individual or classroom use, Architectures of Possibility theorizes and questions the often unconscious assumptions behind such traditional writing gestures as temporality, scene, and characterization; offers various suggestions for generating writing that resists, rethinks, and/or expands the very notion of narrativity; visits a number of important concerns/trends/obsessions in current writing (both on the page and off); discusses marketplace (ir)realities; hones critical reading and manuscript editing capabilities; and strengthens problem-solving muscles from brainstorming to literary activism.

Exercises and supplemental reading lists challenge authors to push their work into self-aware and surprising territory.

In addition, Architectures of Possibility features something entirely lacking in most books about creative writing: more than 40 interviews with contemporary innovative authors, editors, and publishers (including Robert Coover, Lydia Davis, Brian Evenson, Shelley Jackson, Ben Marcus, Carole Maso, Scott McCloud, Steve Tomasula, Deb Olin Unferth, Joe Wenderoth, and Lidia Yuknavitch) working in diverse media, providing significant insights into the multifaceted worlds of experimental authors' writing.

Lance Olsen is author of more than 20 books of and about innovative writing, including the novelsCalendar of Regrets, Head in Flames, and Nietzsche’s Kisses. His short stories, essays, poems, and reviews have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, such as Conjunctions, Black Warrior Review, Fiction International, Village Voice, BOMB, McSweeney’s, and Best American Non-Required Reading. He serves as chair of FC2’s Board of Directors and teaches experimental narrative theory and practice at the University of Utah.

Collaborator Trevor Dodge is author of the novel Yellow #10 and short-fiction collection Everyone I know Lives on Roads, as well as co-editor of the Northwest Edge anthologies of experimental narrative. He teaches writing, literature, comics, and games studies at Clackamas Community College in Oregon Cityand the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland.

Bust Down the Door & Eat All the Chickens #10

Issue #10 of Bust Down the Door and Eat All the Chickens is now available. Included is my story "The Huis Clos Hotel," reprinted from my fiction collection They Had Goat Heads. Here’s the complete table of contents:

"Guess What" by Amanda Billings
"The Hector Report" by Eric Hawthorn
"Artichoke" by Kirsten Alene
"Excursions in Viral Psychology" by Kirk Jones
"Romantic Fucking Comedy" by Andrew W. Adams
"#30" by Laird Hunt
"The Huis Clos Hotel" by D. Harlan Wilson
"Die You Donut Bastards!" by Cameron Pierce
"Death and the People" by Amber Sparks
Review of Steve Lowe's
Muscle Memory by Matthew Revert
Review of Shane Jones's A Cake Appeared by Bradley Sands

Order a copy here. This may be the last issue of Bust Down the Door; editor-in-chief Bradley Sands has stepped down, and I'm not sure if a new editor will take the reigns. Too bad. It's my favorite underground journal of fiction. But all good things must come from a hen . . .

Flash Fiction by Madeleine Sue

Here are some of my 4-year-old daughter's most recent flash fictions:

The Green Tower

Mom is bringing her dog. She is by herself. The tower was green. The lamp made her see. She has ruby slippers on.

The Gobble-Gobble Turkey

Put the turkey in a pan. Cook the turkey in the oven for 100 days. Toss the turkey in your hands and then you just eat the gobble-gobble turkey.

Stuff

Me and my Mom are doing stuff. The wind is blasting over the house.

Storm of the Witch

Dorothy is with her Grandma and Toto. There was a storm of the witch.

Another Blurb for The Kyoto Man

My publisher forwarded me another blurb for The Kyoto Man today, this one from Lofton Gitt, author of The Pale of Escarpment:

"The techno-absurdist futurity of The Kyoto Man and the Scikungi Trilogy manifests an infrequent, if nonexistent, phenomenon, notwithstanding narratives that have been deemed as such by educational and publishing institutions for their own dubious ends: high literary science fiction."

Gitt's story "Autocracy" appears in the latest issue of The Dream People.

Laurence A. Rickels on The Kyoto Man

Laurence A. Rickels, Sigmund Freud Professor of Media and Philosophy at the European Graduate School, has this to say about The Kyoto Man and the Scikungfi Trilogy:

"Not only philosophical and analytic reflection can be found hiding out in SF but even the work of revaluation and reinvention of artistic genres and styles. Against the yawning horizon of contemporary narrative D. Harlan Wilson turns up the vertical contrast of poetic prose. I was invited by my students to visit, as the one it takes to know another one, his laboratory of endopsychic science fiction. Following the deferral of my resistance to the proposed transference of recognition value, I finally did enter. But what took me by surprise was not as much the visualizable elements of the fictional world/word or its intellectual properties—served up on a splatter—as the exploration of poetic style carried forward, to my mind, from a recent repressed past of invention. The Scikungfi Trilogy is our continuity shot wit Ezra Pound's The Cantos."

I discovered Rickels' work recently when I reviewed his latest book, I Think I Am Philip K. Dick, a rigorous schizoanalysis of the science fiction author's unique oeuvre of "unmourning," for Extrapolation. I recently acquired some of his other books, namely Nazi Psychoanalysis, The Case of California and The Vampire Lectures. His vision, ingenuity and breadth of knowledge are unparalleled and absolutely essential reading for Scikungfi enthusiasts, theorists and student-things.

Lint & Goat Heads at BizarroCon

Tomorrow night, November 15, you can catch a screening of Lint: The Movie in the UK at the Comica London International Comics Festival. Then, this weekend, the film will be shown at BizarroCon in Portland. My book of short fiction, They Had Goat Heads, has been nominated for the Wonderland Book Award for best collection of 2010; winners of the WBA will be announced on Saturday evening after the dinner banquet.

Fantastique Unfettered #4

Issue 4 of Fantastique Unfettered, a periodical of liberated literature, is now available. Here's the lineup:

FICTION:
"Azif" by Lynne Jamneck
"The Bachorum Principle" by Brenda Stokes Barron
"The Butterfly Collection of Miss Letitia Willoughby Forbes" by Alma Alexander
"Mr. White Umbrella" by Georgina Bruce
"Sons of the Law" by Hal Duncan
"Stolen Souls" by Mike Allen
"Three Tales of the Devil’s Wife" by Carmen Lau
"Vérité by D. Harlan Wilson

POETRY:
"Seed the Earth, Burn the Sky," "Binary," and "Sisyphus Crawls" by Mike Allen
"Self-Portrait" by Shweta Narayan
"'cubus" by Dan Campbell
"At the Crossroads of the West" by J. C. Runolfson
"Life Decisions" by Kaolin Fire
"Black Sheep" by Jacqueline West
"Clones Evaporate Faster" by Kristine Ong Muslim

NONFICTION:
Interview: Hal Duncan & Brent Weeks
Review: The Night Circus
"Life is Suffering: The Writer's Point of View" by Hal Duncan, Mike Allen & Alexandra Seidel
"This Inscrutable Light: A Response to Thomas Ligotti’s The Conspiracy Against the Human Race" by Brandon H. Bell

Verite

My short story, "Verite," will be published in issue 4 of Fantastique Unfettered. This piece will appear down the road in Vol. I of Battle without Honor or Humanity.

Architectures of Possiblity

Advanced reader copies of Lance Olsen's fictioneering textbook, Architectures of Possibility: After Innovative Fiction, will be available soon from Guide Dog Books. I helped edit and format the book and have an interview in it. It is an expanded revamp of Rebel Yell: A Short Guide to Fiction Writing, published in the late 1990s; I have used this first edition for years in short story writing courses. The new, updated edition contains lots of new material and will debut in 2012 at the annual AWP convention. Lance and I will both be there. Here's the cover description:

"Ideal for individual or classroom use, Architectures of Possibility theorizes and questions the often unconscious assumptions behind such traditional writing gestures as temporality, scene, and characterization; offers various suggestions for generating writing that resists, rethinks, and/or expands the very notion of narrativity; visits a number of important concerns/trends/obsessions in current writing (both on the page and off); discusses marketplace (ir)realities; hones critical reading and manuscript editing capabilities; and strengthens problem-solving muscles from brainstorming to literary activism.

Exercises and supplemental reading lists challenge authors to push their work into self-aware and surprising territory.

In addition, Architectures of Possibility features something entirely lacking in most books about creative writing: more than 40 interviews with contemporary innovative authors, editors, and publishers (including Robert Coover, Lydia Davis, Brian Evenson, Shelley Jackson, Ben Marcus, Carole Maso, Scott McCloud, Steve Tomasula, Deb Olin Unferth, Joe Wenderoth, and Lidia Yuknavitch) working in diverse media, providing significant insights into the multifaceted worlds of experimental authors' writing.

Lance Olsen is author of more than 20 books of and about innovative writing, including the novelsCalendar of Regrets, Head in Flames, and Nietzsche’s Kisses. His short stories, essays, poems, and reviews have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, such as Conjunctions, Black Warrior Review, Fiction International, Village Voice, BOMB, McSweeney’s, and Best American Non-Required Reading. He serves as chair of FC2’s Board of Directors and teaches experimental narrative theory and practice at the University of Utah.

Collaborator Trevor Dodge is author of the novel Yellow #10 and short-fiction collection Everyone I know Lives on Roads, as well as co-editor of the Northwest Edge anthologies of experimental narrative. He teaches writing, literature, comics, and games studies at Clackamas Community College in Oregon Cityand the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland."

Codename PRague for $0.99

For a limited time, my latest novel, Codename Prague, the second installment in the scikungfi trilogy, is available on Kindle for 99 cents.

The Dream People #36

The latest issue of The Dream People is now available at www.dreampeople.org. Included are fictions by Lofton Gitt, Cat Rambo, A. J. French, Van Aaron Hughes and Rich Ives; novel excerpts by Paul Toth and Michael Gills; stories from the new Monk Punk anthology by David J. West and George Ivanoff; an interview with Joe R. Lansdale; and book reviews by Emory Pueschel. And, of course, the featured website: Kung Fu! Thanks to all of our contributors.

Battle without Honor or Humanity, Vols. I & II

My author-ego D. Harlan Wilson is not yet dead . . . This morning I brokered an informal deal with Raw Dog Screaming Press to publish my upcoming fiction collection, Battle without Honor or Humanity, in two volumes. Here's a taste:

The Dream People

Issue #36 of The Dream People is taking longer than expected to format, but it should be out on time on Nov. 1. Included will be an interview with Joe R. Lansdale and selections from editor A. J. French's new anthology of monkpunk fiction.

Review of LINT: THE MOVIE

A review of Steve Aylett's LINT: THE MOVIE appeared this month in Spike Magazine. Here's an excerpt:

"Similarly to its source material, Lint: The Movie runs episodically with nugget after golden nugget of supreme absurdity, which often go beyond the simple exposition of Lint’s antics and instead into the realm of something meaningful and satiric (despite Aylett himself noting, 'Satire has no effect – a mirror holds no fear for those with no shame'). But exactly what this ‘something’ is is hard to define, making Aylett’s Lint all the less boring and all the more satisfying."

The players in LINT: THE MOVIE include me, Alan Moore, Lord Caul Pin, Stewart Lee, Jeff Vandermeer, Leila Johnston, Mo Ali and Bill Ectric, among others.

Abattoir

My short story, "Abattoir," will appear in Pink Narcissus Press' upcoming anthology, WTF?! Here's a description from the publisher:

"Corrective surgery gone wrong, punk rockers abducted by aliens, and dwarfs obsessed with pomegranates are just a few of the things you will find in this anthology. From the quirky to the serious to the surreal, whatever happens in these stories is bound to leave the reader wondering WTF?!"


Down the road, "Abattoir" will reemerge in my en marche fiction collection, Battle without Honor or Humanity, the follow-up to They Had Goat Heads.

The Alarm Trumpets of the Void

I haven't been blogging lately because . . . In lieu of a commanding explanation, I will simply record tomorrow's workout, the focus of which is shoulders and legs:

Treadmill (Warm-Up): 5 minutes

Chin-Up: 3xfailure

Pulldown (Wide Grip): 5x5-10
superset with
Pulldown (Close Grip): 5x5-10
superset with
Straight Arm Pressdown: 5x5-10

Cable Row: 1x12 1x10 1x8 1x6 1xdropsets

Dumbbell Shrug: 5x8-10

Hack Squat: 1x12 1x10 1x8 1x6 1xdropsets
superset with
Machine Leg Extension: 1x12 1x10 1x8 1x6 1xdropsets

Barbell Romanian Deadlift: 5x8-10

Sitting Calf Raise: 5x10-15

Elliptical (Interval at R14): 25 minutes

Interview

Bill Ectric recently interviewed me. Read it here. Bill and I both appear in LINT: The Movie, a documentary of pulp science fiction author Jeff Lint.

Beneath a Pink Sun

A year or two ago, I recorded a reading of a few stories from They Had Goat Heads and sent them to Kenji Siratori, a Japanese author and artist. He produced this creepy, Pynchon-like audio remix:

Fireworks

My daughter Maddie (4) has penned her latest story:

Fireworks

There was some fireworks and they got over Daddy. Mommy and me and Renee watched Daddy dance.

Haunted Spaces

Congrats to my wife, Dr. Christine Wilson, a fellow English professor at Wright State University-Lake Campus, for the publication of her article, "Haunted Habitability: Wilderness and American Haunted House Narratives," in Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture (Continuum 2010). The anthology received PCA/ACA's 2011 Ray and Pat Browne Award for Best Edited Collection.

Christine was recently blogged about by Tristam Riley-Smith, author of The Cracked Bell: America & the Afflictions of Liberty, vis-a-vis her article. Read the blog here.

Cracked Banner

I came across this curious banner at Cracked.com in an article on Bizarro literature. I don't know where this picture of me came from.



Hayakawa's Mystery Magazine

My story "Digging for Adults," which originally appeared in Stranger on the Loose, has been translated into Japanese and published in the August 2010 issue (No. 654) of Hayakawa's Mystery Magazine. I wish I could read the translation. "Digging for Adults" has also been optioned for a short film.

The Kyoto Man - Wanted Sign

Here is a chapter from my upcoming novel, The Kyoto Man, the third and final installment in my scikungfi trilogy, compliments of Brandon Duncan. You may have to squint to read it:


Extrapolation 52.2

The summer 2011 issue of Extrapolation (52.2) is now available. Here's the lineup:

Umberto Rossi, "The Holy Family from Outer Space: Reconsidering Philip K. Dick's The Divine Invasion

Sandra J. Lindow, "Mapping the Walls of The Dispossessed"

Dominick Grace, "Gotlieb upon Caliban"

Erin S. Young, "Flexible Heroines, Flexible Narratives: The Werewolf Romances of Kelley Armstron and Carrie Vaughn

The Big Book of Bizarro

Today I received a copy of The Big Book of Bizarro in the mail. My story "Scotomization" appears in it. Burning Bulb Publishing put it out, and I've never worked with them before, so I didn't know what to expect. True to its name, this anthology of Bizarro horror, sci-fi & fantasy, and erotica fiction is BIG, and it's immaculately edited and laid out. And most importantly, the content is unique, innovative and compelling ... something I rarely encounter. If you like my writing, I suspect you'll like this book. Thanks to the editors, Rich Bottles Jr. and Gary Lee Vincent, for their keen eyes and deft aesthetic mojo.

They Had Goat Heads for $0.99

For a limited time, my latest collection of stories and flash fiction, They Had Goat Heads, is available on Kindle and Nook for $0.99. The book was recently nominated for the Wonderland Book Award.

They Had Goat Heads & the Wonderland Award

They Had Goat Heads has made the final ballot for the 2011 Wonderland Book Award in the Best Collection category. See all of the nominees here. Only BizarroCon attendees are eligible to vote by sending an email to bizarrocon@yahoo.com. Voting ends October 31.

D. Harlan Wilson

The Kyoto Man will be the last book published under the "D. Harlan Wilson" identity tag for the foreseeable future. Thereafter I will write under a pseudonym that I've attached to a few stories published in mainstream and literary magazines, and I'm working on a novel in this vein. I'll still exist online as this version of myself, if only as a ghost, or a residue, but for a variety of reasons, personal and professional, "D. Harlan Wilson" won't be linked with the new pseudonym. Thanks to those of you (readers, publishers, editors, authors and agents) who have supported and endorsed me over the years.

Highlights from ReaderCon 22

I had lunch with my old mentor, advisor and friend Robert Crossley, whose latest book, Imagining Mars: A Literary History, was featured on Wesleyan University Press's table in the dealer room. Bob ordered oysters for an appetizer and I ordered clam chowder. It was great to see him.

Other highlights include two workouts in the hotel gym.

Lavie Tidhar Blurbs The Kyoto Man

Here is what Lavie Tidhar says about my final scikungfi novel, The Kyoto Man:

"D. Harlan Wilson writes with the crazed precision of a futuristic war machine gone rogue. He is devastatingly good."

Lavie is the author of the monstrously imaginative steampunk novels The Bookman and Camera Obscura as well as numerous other books and stories. He lives a rather dynamic online life at Facebook, Twitter, and his official website.

ReaderCon 22

On behalf of Raw Dog Screaming Press, I will be attending ReaderCon next weekend, July 14-17, in Burlington, MA. Here's my schedule:

Friday, July 15

11:30 A.M. Reading. D. Harlan Wilson. Wilson reads from the new novel Codename Prague (Raw Dog Screaming Press 2011), the second installment in his scikungfi trilogy.

Saturday, July 16

3:00 P.M. Autographs. Paul Levinson, Rick Wilber, D. Harlan Wilson.
6:00 P.M. Panel: Science Fiction for Today's Undergraduate. Michael Cisco, Leigh Grossman (leader), Joan Slonczewski, D. Harlan Wilson, Gregory A. Wilson. Works of science fiction show up on college reading lists both for courses focused on SF and those that brush by science fictional ideas on their way to someplace else. Many students are familiar with SF in media, but far fewer have read much written SF. But how much does that matter? How does the experience of teaching SF texts differ from that of teaching other works, if it does at all? Do today's hyper-technologized students experience different challenges (or affinities) than previous generations of students? What SF texts particularly engage them? Our panelists, all of whom have taught SF texts in their classes, will talk about the peculiarities of teaching SF in the undergraduate classroom and relate their experiences, good, bad, and alien.
This will be my first appearance at ReaderCon. I just realized that Joan Slonczewski is on the same panel as me. I met her in 1997 at the Science Fiction Research Association's annual convention in Los Angeles, when I was in grad school, years before I had published any fiction or criticism. I remember having just read her novel A Door into Ocean (1986) and being kind of in awe of her: I had never met a novelist before.
When I'm not doing my things at ReaderCon, I'll be in the fitness room, the bar, or the Raw Dog Screaming Press table in the dealer room with author John Lawson. Feel free to buy me a beer or a protein shake.

Fred Olen Ray Blurbs The Kyoto Man

Cult filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, actor, and editor Fred Olen Ray has this to say about The Kyoto Man, the upcoming third and final installment in my scikungfi trilogy:

"A dark, trippy tale that pays homage to the past masters."

I discovered Fred's work long ago in the form of Weird Menace (1994), a collection of hilarious meta-pulp stories that he edited, then turned to his films (over 100 of them), beginning with Honey Britches (1972) and Alien Dead (1980) ... I'm eagerly anticipating Supershark (2011), starring John Schneider from the original Dukes of Hazzard, and Buck Rogers Begins (2011), starring none other than Gil Gerard. If you don't know Fredor Gil Gerard, for that matter—you should not be reading this blog.

Fred's many exploits are itemized at IMDB, Wikipedia, and his official website.

The Kyoto Man will be published in an as-of-yet undisclosed science fictionalized future ...

Codename Prague for $0.99

This is the last day of the $0.99 ebook sale of Codename Prague on Kindle and Nook. Thanks to my publisher, Raw Dog Screaming Press, for putting it on. Lots of copies sold and if everything adds up I should be able to unofficially retire by the end of the week ...

Codename Prague on Nook

Thanks to everybody who picked up an e-copy of Codename Prague for $0.99 today. The sale continues tomorrow until midnight. The novel is available on both Kindle and Nook.

Codename Prague on Kindle

On July 5th and 6th, the new Kindle version of Codename Prague will be available for $0.99. Get it here.

Hiatus

My blogging will be sporadic for the rest of the summer during my book tour throughout select Indonesian islands to promote Codename Prague. I leave tomorrow. I'm keeping the tour more or less a secret in hopes that only unsuspecting Indonesians will attend my readings and signings. I will say that I have been to Singapore before and look forward to returning. It is a clean and beautiful country, although humid, and gum is illegal. Years ago, somebody spit a chewed wad of Doublemint onto a railroad track, derailing a train. Government regulation ensued.

Review of They Had Goat Heads

Kate Onyett has written a erudite review of They Had Goat Heads (vis-a-vis structuralism) for Sein und Werden. Here's the first two paragraphs:

"Getting to grips with this book is akin to those dreams one has when one knows it is important to run, to move fast, but cannot; a force holds one back; a binding, slowing force. It prevents independent flight and demands that one submit to the direction and timing of the dream. This can feel very threatening; what should be familiar (running, walking) becomes skewed, slanted and something alien and uncertain.

Wilson takes what we might think of as a story and then percolates it through a filter of his own devising. He is either a genius or an egotist; or possibly both, as they tend to be twinned facets of one jealous breath of description, and we are forced to play the game and read the book on his lines. Those lines are non-sequiteur comments, lined up after another, seemingly with little connection and wildly descriptive, contrasting landscapes of potential meanings. Any reaction is entirely in the eye and mind of the reader. Funnily enough, I would be willing to bet that despite this people could read the same messages embedded in this crazed fictional landscape; that though the message seems garbled, the gist would be similar to most readers. Those that bear with it and finish it, that is. For those to whom it is impenetrable, this reaction has already sorted them from those who can claim to find a meaning and would follow in understanding. And as random as the narratives seem, I doubt that there would be too many randomised readings."

And here's the Final Word:

"Come that day Wilson manages to create work that can direct specifically examined content with all the obscure working-out of his current style, he will truly be a speculative giant, indeed."

Ah, Bartleby ...

Technologized Desire Interview

Here is an interview I did last year with Russian author V. Ulea on my book of sf criticism and theory, Technologized Desire: Selfhood & the Body in Postcapitalist Science Fiction. The interview originally appeared online in Saucytooth's Webthology, which has since disappeared.

Science Fiction Criticism

This morning I compiled a list of some of my favorite books of science fiction criticism (shamelessly including my own Technologized Desire) at Goodreads. See it here.

Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts

My review-essay on Anthony Miccoli's Posthuman Suffering & the Technological Embrace, "Enter the Posthuman," appears in the latest issue (22.1) of Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts. There are also a lot of other compelling reviews alongside essays on Lost, Zombieland, Dune and I, Robot.

Battle without Honor or Humanity #7

Optics

There’s a scene in Snow White & the Seven Dwarves (1937), near the beginning, where the Queen orders a huntsman to kill the femme nature. The huntsman doesn’t want to do it, but he’s scared of the Queen, so he goes into the woods. Snow White is singing songs with birds. The hunstman takes out a knife and sneaks up behind her. He steps on a twig. Startled, she glances over her shoulder and we see the reflection of her widening eyes in the blade ...

“My daughter consistently misreads the scene,” I explain, “thinking the huntsman’s intent is not to murder her, but rather to measure her eyes. She neither cares nor knows what for. The knife thus emerges as an instrument of optical calculation intended either to improve or disprove Snow White’s quality of life.”

A voice the likes of the Magic Mirror, cavernous and dreamy, replies to me from the rafters, the sewers: “You don’t have a daughter. You never have. Additionally, that’s not how it happens. The huntsman doesn’t step on a twig. As he creeps towards her, his shadow grows and swallows Snow White, and she gets wise to the darkness behind her. Something else. We don’t see her reflection in the blade. And her eyes barely crack a smile, in a manner of speaking. It is the huntman’s eyes that inflate like kamikaze moon rocks and burn brightly with fear and self-loathing for being a coward and not standing up to the Queen.”

“The Queen?” cries Snow White ...

Mourning Goats Interview

The Goat (a.k.a. "The Goat") has interviewed me at Mourning Goats. This is possibly the longest interview I've done. In it, I discuss goats, the writing and publishing industry, getting your Ph.D., living abroad, teaching college, bodybuilding, and fictionalizing with a hammer ...

They Had Goat Heads & the Wonderland Award

My fiction collection They Had Goat Heads is up for the Wonderland Book Award in the Best Collection category. If you liked it, please vote for it here, along with a righteous slue of other eligible Bizarro books, in the Best Collection category as well as Best Novel. Anybody can vote, and the judges ask that you submit nominees for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. Simply mail bizarrocon@yahoo.com with your recommendations.

LINT: The Movie

LINT: The Movie, starring Alan Moore, Stewart Lee, Steve Aylett, Josie Long, Jeff Vandermeer, me, Robin Ince, Mitzi Szereto, Bill Ectric, Andrew O'Neill, Vessel, 7-Inch Stitch, etc., etc. ... There will be a screening in the United Kingdom in Brighton on June 26. Click here for details.
Purchase tickets here.
The film is based on Steve Aylett's books LINT and And Your Point Is?

Aylett's books, LINT paraphernalia, and The Caterer comics will be on sale at the venue.