Review in The Rumpus

James Reich has written an intuitive review of Freud: The Penultimate Biography for The Rumpus. It's the best review of the book I've read. Here's an excerpt: 

"This is not a book. It is an algorithm. D. Harlan Wilson’s trilogy of Hitler: The Terminal BiographyFreud: The Penultimate Biography and Douglass: The Lost Autobiography are Magrittesque artifacts. Certainly not biographies in the conventional sense of the genre, these titles may not be, strictly, books, whatever those are these days. They are experiments in deconstructing the supposedly cynical matrices of literature in the Internet age, where units are defined and shifted algorithmically, by guilty—sometimes arbitrary—associations with other books . . . The voice of The Penultimate Biography is both a ghost in the machine and a spanner in the works."

Blurb & Preorder for Primordial

James Reich has written an insightful blurb for my upcoming novel, Primordial: An Abstraction, which will be published later this year by Anti-Oedipus Press:
"Primordial is the terse, angular coup de grĂ¢ce that The Campus Novel has been pleading for: a hilarious gonzo screed against the mediocre effacements of academia, a Monty Python riot broken by violent outbursts of common sense."
James is the author of two highly acclaimed novels, Bombshell and I, Judas, both published by Soft Skull Press. He is also a faculty member at Santa Fe University of Art & Design. Find out more about him at JamesReichBooks.com.

Primordial is currently available for preorder directly from the publisher. Free shipping.

Blankety Blank on Kindle

My absurdist meta-historical novel Blankety Blank: A Memoir of Vulgaria (Raw Dog Screaming Press 2008) is now available on Kindle. If you buy or bought a print copy from Amazon, you can download the Kindle for free.

Special Issue of Extrapolation


Call for Papers

Extrapolation is seeking essays for a special issue on Indigenous Futurism, edited by Grace L. Dillon, Michael Levy and John Rieder. Here's are the details:

In the last decade and a half, a number of scholars have explored the way that SF throughout the last century and a half has borne a close relationship to colonial (and later postcolonial) history, discourses, and ideologies. One of the most prominent features of colonial ideology in SF has been the widespread assumption that the future will be determined by the technological and cultural dominance of the West, the “progress” of which often entails the assumption that non-Western cultures will either disappear or  assimilate themselves to Western norms. Indigenous Futurism designates a growing movement of writing, both fictional and critical, that envisions the future from the point of view of Indigenous histories, traditions, and knowledges—and in so doing situates the present and the past in ways that challenge (neo/post)colonial ideologies of progress. This special issue of Extrapolation aims to bring together critical and scholarly explorations of and responses to fictional or theoretical and critical work in or on Indigenous SF, where SF is broadly conceived of as including science fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy, and slipstream.

Topics might include but are not limited to:


  • fictional and theoretical confrontations of Western science and Indigenous knowledges
  • use of Indigenous traditions in fiction or theory to envision a sustainable future
  • responses to and evaluation of Indigenously-inflected SF in any medium from any geographic location
  • representation and use of Indigenous traditions in classic SF texts
  • Indigeneity and SF adventure fiction, Indigeneity and space opera, Indigeneity and the New Weird
  • challenges of publishing and distributing Indigenous Futurism

Please send submissions of 5,000-12,000 words to John Rieder by April 1, 2015. Submissions should conform to the usual requirements of Extrapolation.

Goodreads Giveaway Complete


The Goodreads giveaway for an autographed copy of Douglass: The Lost Autobiography is complete. Congrats to the winner, Russ Myers. Your guidebook to better couch-jumping will be sent out this week.

Book Riot


There's an illuminating review of the Biographizer Trilogy in Book Riot written by Sean Bell. Here's a blurb:

"The Biographizer Trilogy . . . is like a series of magic tricks that the magician painstakingly explains, but which nevertheless still dazzle the audience and retain an element of mystery. Meanwhile, as Wilson is explaining his tricks, he’s also stealing your wallet. He’s pulling moves we’re not even aware of until the aftermath."